Monday, July 10

Theater Review: Beef and Boards Dinner Theatre: Ring of Fire

At first glance, Ring of Fire, opening this past weekend at Beef and Boards, Indianapolis, looks to be a glorious night filled with a guy who sounds and looks a lot like music legend Johnny Cash. Be forewarned. It's not.

It is not a Cash tribute band. It isn't an imitation of the Man in Black, with all of his hits performed fully while you reminisce about the times you saw him live.

Featuring three female and five male performers, the group of eight walk you through his life, via both well known and some lesser known songs written by, sung by, and/or related somehow to Cash. Each musician plays no fewer than two, some as many as five different instruments in the show. Mandolins, fiddles, various guitars, drums and a ukulele are just a few of the instruments used throughout the production. Collectively, these eight are John R. Cash.

The bio-musical skims the more well known personal bits of Cash's life, drug use, and the relationship and eventual marriage to June Carter Cash, delving more into the whys and wherefores.

Melody Allegra Berger, Tim Drake, Brian Gunter, Jill Kelly Howe, Allison Kelly, Jeremy Sevelovitz, Travis Smith and Zack Steele bring their talents together, blending harmoniously with songs such as "Oh Come Angel Band," Standout duets and solos include "Ragged Old Flag" (Drake) and "Jackson" (Steele, Kelly).

Bottom Line: Beef and Boards' Ring of Fire brings forth the more obscure songs of Johnny Cash with a healthy dose of instrumentals sharing the limelight.

 Images: JulieCurry.com


Elizabeth J. Musgrave writes two magazine food and wine columns: Destination Dining and White Linen & Corks,and is a travel, features, food and wine writer, travel and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. She also is a speaker, consultant and trainer for hospitality, travel and luxury businesses, P.R., and tourism groups, as well as a radio and television guest and host. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Sunday, May 7

Theater Review: The Phoenix Theatre: The Open Hand


Guest Review: John Simmons

The Open Hand Phoenix Theatre Now Through May 14

Robert Caisley’s The Open Hand is a play filled with surprises – and that may be part of its undoing.

The play opens simply enough with two friends, Allison (Leah Brenner) and Freya (Julie Mauro) lunching at an expensive Asian restaurant. When Freya rushes out to a super-important job interview, Allison is stuck with a check she cannot pay because she can’t find her billfold. Suddenly, a dapper middle-aged stranger named David Nathan Bright (nicely played by Charles Goad) appears and gives Allison both the money for the check and an umbrella for the rain that is pouring down outside … all without asking for a thing in return.

After that, The Open Hand becomes a play in three parts. Part I channels the comic banter from classic sitcoms (the old Dick Van Dyke Show comes to mind) where we learn about the trials facing Allison in her relationship with her talented-but-edgy boyfriend, Todd (Jeremy Fisher), and Freya in her relationship with her laid-back-but-unhappy boyfriend, Jack (Jay Hemphill). Allison, in particular, struggles with expressing her emotions and accepting love from others. She also has a birthday fast approaching … but Allison never, ever celebrates her birthday.

A chance meeting in the park with David Nathan Bright and Allison’s decision to invite him to her “not-birthday” party (two of the play’s somewhat awkward contrivances) lead us into the play’s hilarious and dramatic Part II. David’s seemingly endless affability and generosity lead to feelings of suspicion, jealousy and, finally, anger among his fellow party-goers, as they try endlessly to discern his “real” motives. Here, The Open Hand asks a great question: Have we become so insecure and competitive as a society that we can no longer accept simple acts of kindness from one another? Are we that cynical?
That question goes unanswered, as the play’s closing act moves it away from being a comedy of manners and more towards a story about personal forgiveness. Allison’s birthday-averse behavior and emotional rigidity, it seems, are the results of a traumatic event from her past, an event that is so traumatic (and, like other plot twists, somewhat contrived) that it almost feels like “too much”.

Phoenix’s The Open Hand is a marvelously well-told tale. The cast are all excellent, and Jeffrey Martin’s revolving set − which does quadruple duty as a restaurant, two city apartments and a townhouse – is a wonder to behold. It’s just that, with one too many plot twists on the part of the playwright, you may find yourself wanting a more satisfying resolution to the tale.

Images: Phoenix Theatre

Elizabeth J. Musgrave writes two magazine food and wine columns: Destination Dining and White Linen & Corks,and is a travel, features, food and wine writer, travel and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. Catch her as the Travel & Leisure Adviser on FOX59 Morning News Show. She also is a speaker, consultant and trainer for hospitality, travel and luxury businesses, P.R., and tourism groups, as well as a radio and television guest and host. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Monday, April 17

Theatre Review: Beef and Boards: My Fair Lady

My Fair Lady, once a hit upon Broadway with Julie Andrews, became a film hit with Audrey Hepburn at the helm as Eliza Doolittle, the flower girl turned lady.

Beef and Boards, Indianapolis, brings back to stage the classic tale of rags to silk ~ and “it's complicated” love ~ through May 14.
Portraying the self indulgent, narcissistic, phonetic expert Professor Henry Higgins is David Schmittou.  Flawlessly portraying the pompous know-it-all with zero clue as to his own feelings, Schmittou brings out the vulnerable side of the grammarian without losing his irritating side. Never wavering from correct form or accent, Schmittou brings the audience nearly to tears with his rendition of, “I've Grown (Accustomed to Her Face)” and to tears of laughter with “Why Can't a Woman (Be more like a man?).
Kimberly Doreen Burns deftly nails Eliza, the flower urchin striving to better her “place” in life, brilliantly adopting the cockney accent ~ a difficult one to acquire. Daring to approach the rich and famous Higgins' for language lessons, Burns' wonderful portrayal of the “guttersnipe” is feisty, confused and (appropriately) enraged at the lack of empathy from her tutor. Burns best showcased her vocal talent in, “I Could Have Danced all Night.”
 
Schmittou and Burns spar delightfully while Mark Goetzinger's portrayal of sidekick Colonel Pickering is equally enchanting. Buffering the insecure pupil from the overbearing Higgins' Goestinger's Pickering is the perfect balance to Higgins' and Eliza's polar opposite (yet somehow similar) behavior and expectations.

Eddie Curry, portraying Eliza's father, Alfred Doolittle, is a pure joy to watch as he wallows in the low existence he has created, embracing his lot in life as a scoundrel and drunk. Womanizing, and shirking all responsibilities, Alfred is angry when he finds himself in the a world of middle class morality, bringing down the house with, “Get Me to the Church on Time.”

Bottom Line: My Fair Lady is easily one of the TOP 10 shows I have reviewed at Beef and Boards bringing a classic to stage with one of the most cohesive casts assembled at the north-side theater ~ clearly a Must-See for the 2017 season.

 Images: JulieCurryPhotography.com

Elizabeth J. Musgrave writes two magazine food and wine columns: Destination Dining and White Linen & Corks,and is a travel, features, food and wine writer, travel and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. Catch her as the Travel & Leisure Adviser on FOX59 Morning News Show. She also is a speaker, consultant and trainer for hospitality, travel and luxury businesses, P.R., and tourism groups, as well as a radio and television guest and host. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Sunday, March 26

Theater Review: Phoenix Theatre: Sex with Strangers


*Written by guest reviewer John Simmons*

Despite its provocative title, playwright Laura Eason’s Sex with Strangers isn’t really about sex,although it does start out that way. The play, at Phoenix Theatre, Indianapolis, through April 9, begins in an out-of-the way B&B that serves as a safe haven for writers.

Here we meet 30- (or is it 40?) something Olivia, whose been badly bruised by the public’s reception of her first novel. Olivia’s world is suddenly upended by the sudden appearance of the much younger − and far-too-sexy – Ethan. Turns out that Ethan is an internet sensation whose online memoir, blog and soon-to-be movie, Sex with Strangers, document his singular accomplishment of having sex with at least one new woman per week for a year. He’s also a huge fan of Olivia’s first novel and (after taking a sneak peek) her unpublished second one.


With the heavy snowfall outside robbing Olivia and Ethan of the internet and access to the outside world, what else is there for them to do – except begin bonking one another just minutes into Act I? It isn’t revealing too much to say that supremely tech-savvy Ethan helps Olivia self- publish an online version of her new novel, while Olivia uses her far more limited social media skills to learn about Ethan’s sordid past ... all with unintended consequences.

The Phoenix Theatre’s production of the two-person show
features some nice performances by real-life couple Angela R. Plank as Olivia and Brandon Alstott as Ethan, but there’s a certain subtext that’s missing.

Alstott draws a convincing portrait of a young man who seems genuinely smitten, is willing to put his sexually overactive past behind him and wants to be taking seriously as a writer. But should we really believe Ethan can move on from all the money, women and fame that keep coming his way? Plank does a nice job showing us Olivia’s fears in getting involved with Ethan and having her new work rejected. But there’s also the suggestion that quietly ambitious Olivia questions Ethan’s commitment because, having benefited from his help in achieving a success she only dreamed of, Erotic Ethan is no longer good enough for her.

Sex with Strangers is more than just the story of a woman who cannot move beyond the toxic bad boy in her life. Strangers is about the lies we tell others in relationships and about the lies we tell ourselves – about ourselves – to justify our own bad behavior. By adding this extra layer of ambiguity – by ‘muddying the waters’ just a bit – Phoenix’s production of Sex with Strangers would move from being a good production to a great one.

Images: Zach Rosing


John Simmons recently moved back to his hometown of Indianapolis from New York City, where he stage managed or produced numerous off-Broadway shows. John was also General Manager of The Active Theater.

Elizabeth J. Musgrave writes two magazine food and wine columns: Destination Dining and White Linen & Corks,and is a travel, features, food and wine writer, travel and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. Catch her as the Travel & Leisure Adviser on FOX59 Morning News Show. She also is a speaker, consultant and trainer for hospitality, travel and luxury businesses, P.R., and tourism groups, as well as a radio and television guest and host. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Tuesday, March 21

Theater Review: TOTS: Rock of Ages

*Written by guest reviewer, John Simmons:

If you know anything about Rock of Ages, now playing at Theatre on the Square, Indianapolis, then you know that it is by no means a typical musical. In fact, its razor-thin story line merely serves as the backdrop for an over-the-top, absurdly raunchy celebration (falling somewhere between a tribute and a parody) of the excesses of classic 80's Rock 'n' Roll musicians.
What little story there is centers on Drew (Davey Pelsue), an aspiring rocker who works as a bus boy at Sunset Strip's Bourbon Club, and Sherrie (Sarah Hoffman), a small town Midwestern girl who’s come to Hollywood to make it big in the movies.
Throw in club owners, with a secret yet-to-be-revealed, Lonny (John Kern) and Dennis (Dave Ruark), fading rock star and sometime sex addict, Stacee Jaxx (Thomas Cardwell), and two German developers, Hertz (Bryan D. Padgett) and his sexually ambiguous son, Franz (Zach Ramsey) who are intent on buying, and tearing down, the club. Also include city planner Regina (Andrea Heiden) who is vehemently opposed to any remodeling of the Sunset Strip, and Madam Justice (Paige Scott) and the working girls (Jordan Fox, Tessa Gibbons and Katherine Jones) of the Venus Strip Club. The storyline – sometimes artfully, sometimes awfully – weaves in the music of such 80's giants as Journey, Pat Benatar and REO Speedwagon, (among others) to tell its tale.
The stunning renditions of Harden My Heart/Shadows of the Night and Here I Go Again ending Act I – just as Drew is about to give up his dream of becoming a rock star and join a boy band and Sherrie sees no future for herself beyond joining the working girls at Venus as a stripper – are well worth your time. So is the lovely, all-cast rendition of that quintessential 80’s love song Every Rose Has Its Thorn.
If high camp is more to your liking, you’ll enjoy over-the-top performances (and sudden surprises) of Hit Me with Your Best Shot and Can’t Fight This Feeling. Ages’ stirring finale, Don’t Stop Believin’ – in which cast me­mbers break the fourth wall and invite audience members to join them onstage as part of the celebration – will certainly have you on your feet.
Like the 80's rock scene itself, TOTS' Rock of Ages is heavy on the raunch. It’s rough and raggedy, with enough poop jokes, double entendres and simulated sex acts to offend almost everyone, while making you howl with laughter. The show makes no pretenses at being a work of art but, whatever your mood is going in and for however briefly, it will take you away from your problems and have you singing along/dancing in the aisles … and there is a lot to be said for that.

Images: provided by TOTS


John Simmons recently moved back to his hometown of Indianapolis from New York City, where he stage managed or produced numerous off-Broadway shows. John was also General Manager of The Active Theater. Active Theater alumni who have gone on to bigger and better things include Grace Gealey (aka Anika on Fox’s Empire) and Lucy Owens (now appearing in Miss Sloane).

Elizabeth J. Musgrave is a luxury, travel, features, food and wine writer, travel, wine and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. Catch her as the Travel & Leisure Adviser on television and radio. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Sunday, February 26

Things to do in Indianapolis March 2017


It's warm, it's cold, it's raining, then snowing, then sunny.... strange winter in Indianapolis indeed. You just decide it is a good time to go hiking, when the temps drop and the snow falls. As March rolls its way in, the weather will continue to flip flop. Outside, or in, there are always things to do in Indianapolis.
Here are my TOP 5 recommendations for March 2017.

Broadway in Indianapolis
If you have not seen it, now is the perfect time as Broadway in 
Indianapolis brings a return performance of Jersey Boys to Clowes Memorial Hall, Butler University February 28 - March 5. This will be my third time to catch it, because it is worth it (read my review here). Then, March 30 – April 2, Motown the Musical takes over The Murat Theatre at ONC. Two great eras of music ~ life is good.

WFYI Ice Miller Wine Fest 2017


Hosted by Ice Miller this wine event will be held Fri., March 3, and has been moved to Old National Center. Still the preeminent fundraiser for WFYI, this annual tasting soiree' is THE wine event for Indy.

Livery Stable
Livery has a rooftop dining experience with spectacular views of Mass Ave's splendor, Lockerbie, Chatham Arch and other historic neighborhoods. This most recent restaurant addition to the Mass-College corner is impressive in its simplicity. The understated urban d├ęcor, efficient and friendly service (an important detail to many), and trendy, well-executed menu ~ both culinary and cocktails ~ make this THE place to catch sunlight, starlight and wonderful views.

Central Canal

The best way to break out of those winter blahs is to take a stroll, bike ride, or brisk walk, along downtown's canal. From war memorials, to fountains and fauna, to people watching, there is always something to do along the waterway.




Cabaret

Moved into its new home (for now), The Cabaret is a perfect reason to dress up. Great talent is brought in from all over for the cozy, intimate club-style ambiance. Fri., March 10, Judy Kuhn performs two shows at Cabaret's new location.




Elizabeth J. Musgrave writes two magazine food and wine columns: Destination Dining and White Linen & Corks,and is a travel, features, food and wine writer, travel and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. Catch her as the Travel & Leisure Adviser on FOX59 Morning News Show. She also is a speaker, consultant and trainer for hospitality, travel and luxury businesses, P.R., and tourism groups, as well as a radio and television guest and host. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Monday, February 20

Review: Dance Kaleidoscope: DIVAS!

Guest review by John Simmons ~

At first glance, Dance Kaleidoscope’s Divas is virtually critic-proof. After all, what’s not to like about an evening of dance choreographed to the music of some of the world’s most celebrated female singers? The evening promises to be one of pure entertainment … and DK’s Divas is certainly all of that.
But, if you look closer, you’ll see something far more interesting (and intriguing) going on.
Structurally, Divas is divided into halves: the first half features nine numbers choreographed by members of DK’s young dance troupe to the music of such world-class divas as Annie Lenox, Celine Dion, Adele, Stevie Nicks, Kelly Clarkson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, Patti LaBelle and Barbra Streisand.
The second half features world premieres of works choreographed DK’s Artistic Director David Hochoy (to the music of Janis Joplin) and Guest Choreographer Nicholas A. Owens (to the music of the great Aretha Franklin). Both halves are ably supported by Costumers Guy Clark and Cheryl Sparks, with especially noteworthy work done by Lighting Designer Laura E. Glover.
As you’d expect, Divas’ second half is highly-polished. In his remarks at intermission, David Hochoy spoke of his admiration – born at an early age – for the music of Janis Joplin, and his tribute to her is full of flashing colors, waves of movement and choreography that emphasizes the physicality of his young dancers. It’s a tribute that captures the energy of Joplin’s music, if not its (occasional) sadness. 
Nicholas Owens’ tribute to Aretha Franklin is somewhat more varied and, at times, more subdued – featuring such show-stopping numbers as (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman and Respect (two songs that are certainly on everyone’s list of all-time favorite songs) and ending with the lovely and beautifully-choreographed First Snow in Kokomo.
In contrast, Divas’ first half is less a tribute to the divas whose music it celebrates and more of a look inside the minds of the next generation of choreographers, as they explore issues of concern to young people everywhere. Themes covered here include sex, love, the excitement of a first kiss, the joy of self-discovery and the loss of a parent. While technically polished, Divas’ first half is especially interesting because of the idiosyncratic, almost quirky, choices DK’s young artists make.
Jillian Godwin’s First Touch (performed to the music of Adele’s I Miss You), for example, is a very muscular, almost aggressive look at the rush that comes with a new relationship. Missy Trulock’s Edge of Seventeen (choreographed to Stevie Nicks’ song of the same name) features imagery that captures the challenges that women face in dealing with a society that wants them to be both empowered and angelic. Zach Young’s Missionary Man (choreographed to Annie Lenox’s song of the same man) features some sexy – if politically incorrect – choreography, exceeded only by the highly politically incorrect choreography offered by Timothy June’s Enlightenment, a hilarious exploration of diversity and self-discovery danced to Shirley Bassey’s I Am What I Am.
Stuart Coleman makes a bold choice for his Don’t Rain on My Parade (performed by Barbra Streisand) by featuring a single dancer in red (Aleksa Lukasiewicz), in a celebration of the simple joy a person feels in declaring their own self-worth and freedom from expectations (a celebration, Coleman says, that was inspired by the rush he felt when singing Parade solo in a karaoke bar!) These are just some examples of the many delights offered by each of Divas’ nine first half performances.
In his remarks at intermission, David Hochoy spoke about how proud he was of his young dancers and how their work on Divas represents an important first step in helping to preserve the legacy of modern dance. Divas certainly offers an evening’s worth of entertainment, as it celebrates the life and work of some of our most talented female artists. But it also makes you wonder what the future holds – and what works of art DK’s talented choreographers will one day create – as they continue on their journey of self-discovery and channel the artistic power of their own inner divas.


*Note* Dance Kaleidoscope will return with the performances:

April 1: Kaleidoscope of Dance Gala, The Westin, Indianapolis - Buy Tickets Online

April 6-9: DK & Friends, IRT - Buy Tickets

June 1-4: The Indianapolis Colts presents Dance is a Contact Sport, IRT - Buy Tickets

Images: Crowe's Eye Photography
Elizabeth J. Musgrave writes two magazine food and wine columns: Destination Dining and White Linen & Corks,and is a travel, features, food and wine writer, travel and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. Catch her as the Travel & Leisure Adviser on FOX59 Morning News Show. She also is a speaker, consultant and trainer for hospitality, travel and luxury businesses, P.R., and tourism groups, as well as a radio and television guest and host. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Monday, February 6

Theater Review: You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown by Buck Creek Players


An appreciation of the Buck Creek Players’ 200th production, You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown, starts with a recognition of the show’s production values. Director Steven R. Linville and his creative team have done a wonderful job of translating one of the world’s most beloved comic strips into a three-dimensional setting.

Set designer Dan Denniston’s work is particularly impressive. Whether it is Snoopy’s doghouse, a school bus, an over-sized easy chair or Lucy’s psychiatrist’s booth famously proclaiming that “The Doctor is In,” Denniston’s designs (and their execution) accurately capture the look and feel of the panels from Charles Schulz’s famous comic strip. Costume designer Donna Jacobi also does a nice job: her costuming for Snoopy is especially clever, while her Woodstock is a work of art. As its name implies, You’re a Good Man, documents the trials and travails of one Charlie Brown, a self-deprecating young man who remains admirably determined to try his best against all odds. He can never win a ballgame (but continues playing baseball); he can never successfully fly a kite (but continues trying to do so); has a terrible crush on a pretty red-haired girl (but can never quite muster up the courage to talk to her … you get the idea). Charlie’s story is told in a series of vignettes and musical numbers, making You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown more like watching a live-action comic strip than a show with a traditional narrative.

Buck Creek has assembled a winning cast to tell this story, starting with D. Scott Robinson (who makes for an able and admirable Charlie Brown). Jessica Bartley is consistently funny (and uber-cute) as Charlie’s argumentative kid sister, Sally. Stacia Ann Hulen is appropriately bossy as Peanuts’ diva-in-waiting, Lucy Van Pelt, while Jacob E. Peterman does a nice job as her younger (and overly philosophical little brother), Linus. Scott A. Fleshood (Schroeder), Jonathan D. Krouse (Snoopy) and Emma Wilson (a quirky and endearing Woodstock) round out the cast … with Fleshood and Krouse each leading the cast in two shop-stopping numbers: Beethoven Day (Fleshood) and Suppertime (Krouse) … with Suppertime being especially snazzy, filled with old-style Broadway razzmatazz.

Peanuts has always been one of our most literate comic strips, with surprisingly complex philosophical and psychological overtones that - in its heyday in the 1960s and '70s - catapulted the comic strip into pop culture icon status (Peanuts ended publication with Charles Schulz’s death in 2000). And while adults can still look back on Peanuts and its characters with fondness, today a show like You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown is really for kids and those who are kids at heart.

If anything works against Buck Creek’s Charlie Brown, it is that the show’s late January/early February run dates (in the dead of winter, when most folks stay at home) may rob the show of the younger, more family-oriented audience it deserves. So …

If you’re looking for some fun, family-oriented entertainment for your kids (and the kid in you), it is well worth your time to brave the cold, journey to Buck Creek and join Charlie, Sally, Lucy, Linus, Snoopy, Schroeder and Woodstock as they tell the delightful (and delightfully entertaining) story of You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown.

Show:
You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown Buck Creek Players
Dates: February 3, 4, 10 and 11 at 8:00 February 5, 12 at 2:30


Elizabeth J. Musgrave writes two magazine food and wine columns: Destination Dining and White Linen & Corks,and is a travel, features, food and wine writer, travel and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. Catch her as the Travel & Leisure Adviser on FOX59 Morning News Show. She also is a speaker, consultant and trainer for hospitality, travel and luxury businesses, P.R., and tourism groups, as well as a radio and television guest and host. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Saturday, January 7

Ticket Giveaway: Broadway in Indianapolis' Sound of Music

Ben Davis as Captain Georg von Trapp
Sound of Music is an American classic providing childhood memories for millions of children nationwide. Thanks to Broadway in Indianapolis, I am giving away two tickets to opening night, Tuesday, January 10, 2017. The show (which is looking to be a sell out all nights) will be performed at Old National Centre.

Check back to this site for a full review on Indiana native Ben Davis as Captain Georg von Trapp, and the entire cast.

HOW TO WIN

To win, simply share this link on your FB page and state your favorite part of Sound of Music. It could be a character, a song, or even a memory. I will check Sunday night at 9 p.m. on all who have shared the link. Whoever generates the most shares of the link from their FB page, WINS!

I will contact you via FB message with details on receiving your tickets.

Ready, Set, Share ~

Images: Matthew Murphy
Elizabeth J. Musgrave writes two magazine food and wine columns: Destination Dining and White Linen & Corks,and is a travel, features, food and wine writer, travel and food photographer, and performing arts and restaurant critic. Catch her as the Travel & Leisure Adviser on FOX59 Morning News Show. She also is a speaker, consultant and trainer for hospitality, travel and luxury businesses, P.R., and tourism groups, as well as a radio and television guest and host. Follow her on Twitter @GottaGo, LinkedIn and Facebook.